Apple TV PLUS Current Head Show should be Scared

Apple has just reached an exclusive partnership with Richard Plepler, one of HBO’s successful chief architects over the past 20 years. According to the New York Times APPLE TV+ Article, Propeller’s new production company has signed a five-year exclusive agreement with Apple’s TV +. If Apple’s entertainment executives don’t worry about what the arrival of the upcoming giant means to their jobs and the future of the platform, then they should probably do so. At least from where I sit.

Apple TV + 's Current Head should be Scared - Technology Shout
Apple TV + ‘s Current Head should be Scared – Technology Shout

In some cases, Plepler resigned as CEO of HBO last year after AT & T acquired Time Warner. At the time, Plepler reportedly found that the merger had minimized his autonomy as AT & T’s boss stepped in and immediately began modifying HBO’s highly successful entertainment model. Last year’s report detailed a new system under which the business model will be closer to Netflix than HBO, that is, producing more content than necessarily good content.

Plepler left after nearly thirty years at HBO. But AT & T’s loss is clearly quickly interpreted as a potential gain for Apple TV +. In many ways, TV + ‘s direct competition with HBO is more direct than other streaming competitors. Apple’s own executives described TV + as the opposite of Netflix.

According to an interview with Pleple by The New York Times, Apple’s Eddy Cue got in touch with a former HBO leader shortly after leaving HBO in February last year. These conversations brought Pplepler into the company as a five-year producer of series, documentaries, and movies made for Apple TV +. Cue, who runs Apple’s services business, including TV +, hired Zack Van Amburg and Jamie Erlich two years ago to oversee the TV + department.

Prepler told The Times that he arrived at Apple on the condition that Van Amburg and Erlich were both games. Considering that the company’s dust accumulation seems to be his driving force to leave HBO, this makes sense for Plepler. According to Plepler’s statement to the New York Times—especially everything he wants to do “is driving my own little PT boat” —may also involve ensuring that his guidance has some autonomy.

But given Apple’s acceptance of its new tent service, Pleipler’s deal with Apple (obviously, he didn’t operate TV +, only contributed) is also meaningful. TV + has not appeared in the cultural world as Apple had hoped. There were problems early on, such as adapting a show based on Dr. Dre’s life because of too much violence, and canceling a show about Richard Gere because the shooting was not enthusiastic.

But the real problem is the first launch of TV + ‘s 2019 plan. Although the Golden Globes of Morning Dawn received a nod, the show (the biggest bet on Apple ’s debut content), like many other original Apple content, generated different reviews. In theory, it didn’t get the attention it deserved.

For all humankind, the platform’s sci-fi TV series tells of space competitions hosted by the Hugo Awards and Emmy Award-winning host Ron Moore, and it has everything. However, this is exactly one of the strongest competitors in the awards season.

As with almost all Apple content products, part of the problem with this series of products is that the typical mystery and slurred methods of Apple’s product launch are fundamentally inconsistent with how you make people ignorant of entertainment. Before the release, the buzz about these shows was almost zero because we knew nothing about them. According to rumors, all viewers knew that Apple TV + was just “expensive NBC” before the launch date. We haven’t heard much about its 2020 lineup, but that doesn’t fully help its cause.

For a company that wants to position itself as a protagonist of news, entertainment, and music, the thin content at the beginning of its listing suggests that Apple’s own arrogance may hinder its ability to meet its audience expectations. And critics.

Mark Duplass, a Chip star in the Morning Show, said so in a recent interview this week. “I think Apple knows this now, but they didn’t do a good job of welcoming critics because they are used to keeping the secrets of the product secret and you won’t keep the secrets when you deal with critics, Duplass told The Hollywood Report in a red carpet review of Bombshel. “Critics don’t like that, and I think they slammed a little bit. ”

As pointed out by The Hollywood Reporter, there is a big difference between the audience and the positive reviews of the series. (Your feelings about Duplass’ performance may depend in part on your response to the individual using a valuable plot technique in the context of a real national tragedy.) But there is no doubt that the platform as a whole can use certain works, and there is a The reason is that many of Apple’s debut series has been left out for their awards.

The deal with Plepler feels like a desire to change Apple’s course. Prepler did tell the New York Times explicitly that he “does not want to run anything anymore” but instead focuses on production. Still between TV + ‘s debut and his deal, if I’m running TV + now, I might be worried.

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